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  • How anyone can build a audience of followers, even if no one knows about you.
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How To Write A “101 Tips” Or “101 Ideas” Book

When it comes to writing a book, the 101 format is one of the easiest to do.

Why?  Because like the simplicity of a shopping list, the content is simply a list of tips, tricks,  and advice that anyone can pull together to create a book.

And when your audience is more interested to gleaning knowledge fast, they don’t require you to write to the level of Hemingway. – Just give the facts and let me act on it, they’re saying as they read your piece. 

But like anything else, you can do it the wrong way or the right way.  Today, we’re going to look at the right way, because really what’s the point in writing this blog post if not to help you write a book that’s going to sell well.

So what do you need to do?

Mistake 1 – Don’t Dump Everything Together Without Any Thought

Once course when you’re doing a brain dump or gathering your research off the web (or wherever you’re collecting it from) your draft is going to be messy and lack any logical pattern.

Not only that, but reading back through your work you’ll probably notice duplicate points, or ones that closely mirror each other.  These need to be ditched or bundled together.  – Yes,  they may help you to get to that magical 101 number but your reader will see that too. You don’t want that.

Mistake 2 – Thinking That All Your Readers Are At One Level

You don’t know what level your reader is at when they come upon your book.  Yes, you may be the first one they’ve bought on the topic,  or you could be the tenth. Because of that, you need to tailor your content to each audience.

Beginner – These are entry level tips. – Getting started, Making their first purchase, Beginner mistakes, or anything else that’s going to get them up and running.

Lesser Known Tips – Once you’ve covered the basics, your next grouping is the lesser know tips and tricks that most people don’t know about. These are the ones that your reader is going to remember you long after they’ve closed the book. They’re also the content that’s going to make them recommend your book to others.

Insider Tips –  Whether you know the subject inside out, or need to interview an expert for these. These tips are ones that they won’t be able to get anywhere outside of your book – unless they’ve got access to your expert.  Like the lesser known tips, having a section of insider tips in your book is what’s going to put your 101 tips book way above your competition.

Mistake 3 – Cut Out The Fluff

Why does anyone buy a 101 tips book? The same reason you would. It’s to get the largest amount of knowledge you can from one place, and in the quickest time.  – It’s get in, get out,  and let me go act on this stuff.

Because of that, you want to cut out the fluff. Not only does it take you time to write, but it takes your reader time to read. Don’t put hurdles in their way because you want to bulk up your book. Cut the fluff and shorten your sentence length. – If you can say the same thing with fewer words do it.

Mistake 4 – Give Credit Where It’s Due

Unless you’re the ultimate expert on turning toe nails into gas for cars, there are other people out there who are going to know tips, tricks,  and advice that you don’t.  Don’t be a dick and not give them credit for that knowledge they’ve put on the web or told you about.

If you need to give credit, give it. Put a section of your book giving reference to where you got that information from. Not only is it the right thing to do, but it proves that you’re human and not a walking Filofax on the topic.

Best of luck with your book.

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