Why Should I Buy Your Book?

How Do I Sell Kindle Books On Amazon

In a world now where anyone can write and publish fiction or non fiction, it’s easy to get lost in the huge ball of writers and authors out there. 

Because of that you’ve got to ask the question, why should anyone buy your book over someone else’s?

You could say that your book is well written – but so could a hundred other authors.

You could say you’re giving readers great usable content – but so could a hundred other authors.

You could say you’ve got an amazing book cover, book description, blurb etc – but so could a hundred other authors.

So why should I buy your book?

When you’re unknown, you’ve got to use anything you can to make yourself unique from everyone else.

It’s come to the stage where anyone and their cat can write best-selling author on a book cover or in a book description.

Even New York Times besting selling author is thrown around a lot.

And while it is a big deal, it supposedly only takes 10,000 book sales to get on it – they’re very selective in who they pick for the list.

But let me ask you, when was the last you as a reader checked out those facts?

When was the last time you did your due diligence and searched the New York Times bestseller list or asked an author for a screen capture of that ‘best selling’ book sales information?

If you’re like me, never.

When I was staring off in the early days of Kindle, there was trend of putting a bestselling Kindle sticker on the cover of your book to boost sales.

Which worked for a while until everyone did it.

And then there was a time when you could put ‘Number 1’ bestselling author on your book because you topped out a book category with only ten books in it. 

Then everyone searched out those least competitive categories and copied suit.  

Which brings us back to square one, why should I buy your book? Out of all the New York Times, Kindle bestseller, Number 1 bestselling authors, what makes you different?

And how do you make yourself different?

It’s actually very easy, and something I learned off Ben Settle from the BenSettle.com podcast.

Simply, give yourself a title.

You’re not just a romance author writing Mail Order Bride Books, you’re ‘Charlotte Campbell – The Queen Of Mail Order Bride Books.’

You’re not just a nonfiction author writing a book on weight loss, you’re ‘Thomas Harris – Number One Expert On Home Built Abs.’

Now you could argue that some of those titles aren’t a definite supportable title, and that they’re just made up, but let me ask you a question. 

When faced with two authors of the same standard and all being equal, which Mail Order romance would you be inclined to buy, Josephine Soap’s, or Charlotte Campbell’s?

What about the nonfiction weight loss example? Would it be Joe Soap’s or Thomas Harris book?

You think maybe that title, although made up, would sway some people to try you out? That you’re different from all the other authors writing in your niche?

The thing is, nobody else can copy that title without being seen as just that, a copycat.

And in the case of the ‘Queen’ title, what picture does that bring to your mind.

  • Someone that’s ahead of everyone else?
  • Someone that’s leading the field?
  • Someone that seems to know what they’re doing?

Still think it’s a daft thing to do? Here’s a real life example of this from the great Joe Vitale.

Joe uses two titles to sign off on, “Mr Fire” or “The author of too many books to mention here.’

Now what is a Mr Fire?

It doesn’t exist, unless you’re Johnny the human torch from the Fantastic Four.

But what picture does it bring to mind?

  • Someone that’s red hot
  • Full of passion
  • The go to guy?

And what about the second, “The author of too many books to mention here”?

After reading that, what do you think?

  • “Wow, that guys written a lot of books.” Because he must have, to make that statement.
  • And your next thought is, “I wonder what they are. I must search now and see.”

Two made up titles, that makes Joe totally unique from all the other authors.

So when it comes to standing out from the crowd, you don’t always need to be a New York Time, or Kindle bestselling author to stand out.

Do good work, give yourself a good title, and suddenly you’re not another face in the crowd. 

It just takes the balls to do it.